Words From Joe: Part 3 – The King

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crownsJoe continued to tell me about his feelings on ministry.  Like I said in Part 1, this was a divine meeting.  His talking had a natural flow to it, like he had prepared this lesson just for me.  Like I have said before, South Africans do not talk unless they have something to say and Joe had more that he felt that I needed to hear.  From useless to pride and now the King.

The number one issue among churches today is serving the Kingdom and not the King.

Beyond pride the number one issue among churches today is serving the Kingdom.  It is church culture that the church be served.  And the pastor is being forced in many cases or gets caught up in serving the church or the kingdom.  Now there is nothing wrong with serving the kingdom.

Matthew 6:33
But seek first his kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well.

The danger is that the kingdom is being served and not the King. Joe said, “follow and serve the King, not the kingdom.  You can serve the kingdom and not the King, but if you serve the King you will always be serving the kingdom…His kingdom.”  If you are serving God, then there is no way that anyone can say that you are not serving the kingdom and you will be sure that you are following what God is having you to do.

Israel found themselves serving the kingdom.  In there case the kingdom was the law.  They were attempting to be completely obedient to the law.  There problem was that in their attempt to be obedient to the law and the kingdom, they forgot God.  My prayer is that the church will wake up and be obedient to God and not to just to church culture.  I understand these are hard and difficult words for some and might even be dangerous and misunderstood. I hope they aren’t and I hope you as the reader understand that we must serve the King, after all, it is His kingdom.

Originally Posted July 30th, 2009

 © Jonathan Haley Uhrig 2014

 © Jonathan Haley Uhrig 2014

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